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has stressed that the role of the u.s. military would be limited in time and scope. our mission has been to use america's unique capabilities to create the conditions for the no-fly zone and to assist in meeting urgent humanitarian needs. as expected, we're already seeing a significant reduction in the number of u.s. planes involved in our operations as the number planes from other countries increase in numbers. today we are taking the next step. we have agreed, along with our nato allies, to transition command and control for the no-fly zone over libya to nato. all 28 allies have also now authorized military authorities to develop an operations plan for nato to take on the broader civilian protection mission under resolution 1973. nato is well-suited to coordinate this international effort and ensuring that all participating nations are working effectively together toward our shared goals. this coalition includes countries beyond nato including arab partners, and we expect all of them to be providing important political guidance going forward. we have always said that arab leer lea
and what this could mean for u.s. forces. we're also standing by for a statement from the secretary of state hillary clinton. we're also standing by for a statement from the nato secretary-general in brussels. stand by for that. >>> moammar gadhafi is still on the attack, on this the sixth night of pounding by the coalition forces. an explosion and anti-aircraft fire echos in tripoli just a little while ago. could the outrageous failure at reagan happen again? the fallout, the danger at two planes coming in for a landing radioed the control tower and got no answer. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." let's begin with the breaking news. the united states may be closer to giving up its lead role in the fight to protect lickance from gadhafi's forces. right now there's new uncertainty, though, about a tentative deal for nato to take command of the mission. we have lots of questions about how this might play out and how it might affect the overall goal of seeing gadhafi go away. the secretary of state hillary clinton will make a statement a little more that an hour from no
's talk about that also with retired u.s. army general george jalwan, the nato allied supreme commander. if in fact this is true that the president in recent days, maybe the past week or two, signed a covert action order, a finding, as they call it, to secretly assist the rebels who are fighting gadhafi's forces, what does that say to you? >> first of all, i have no knowledge of whether he signed a finding or not. it may be one of two things, may be an actual sort of action or it could be keep pressure on gadhafi to really feel the heat that he's feeling now with the resignation of his foreign minister and also with what i think is what is happening in london where the international community is very much united in what needs to be done. >> for all practical purposes the coalition, now nato control, they -- they have taken aside in this civil war, they want to help the rebels and see gadhafi go, even though the u.n. security council resolution didn't go that far as we all know. here's the question. if in fact the president signed a secret finding that goes way beyond what the coalition
, be careful over there. we'll stay in close touch. thank you. >>> u.s. officials say the defection shun of libya's foreign minister shows pressure is having an effect. moussa koussa led to london yesterday. hes the highest ranks official to break with the regime. he once serve as the intelligence chief, and has secrets to tell. the british prime minister says there's no deal of any kind to give moussa koussa immunity. joining us from tripoli, nic robertson. nic, you're getting some reaction from the libyan government on the defection shun of the foreign minister moussa koussa. >> reporter: we haven't had a reaction from the top, gu the government is saying they allowed him to deeffect, because of health reasons. they said he had a heart condition, but it's very clear from the fact that it took them limb 24 hours to respond to the defection that they didn't know it was coming. the government's trying to put the best face on it that they can, but it rings hollow. moussa koussa tricked this government, tricked the leadership and has left the country and left them hanging, wolf. >> how sign
to rain down. aircraft like this u.s. marine corps harrier jet have flown more than 212 missions so far against the libyan forces. ships in the mediterranean has launched more than 160 tomahawk cruise missiles. in the daylight the damage is becoming clear. this is what is left of several large rocket launchers, trucks and also other military hardware in tripoli's port area. far to the east, a u.s. fighter plane crashed due to mechanical problems. that happened near the opposition strong hold of bengahzi. the two-man crew parachuted from the doomed aircraft. u.s. marines managed to extract crewmen, one was picked up by rebels and taken to a luxury hotel suite. he's back in american hands. two days after the coalition missile slammed into his tripoli compound, a defined moammar gadhafi has been addressing supporters. he urged muslims worldwide to join the battle against what he calls blatant aggression. >> translator: we will be victorious in this fight. we will not give up. they will not penalize us. we are making fun of their rockets. the libyans are laughing at these rockets. we will d
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
are outgunned and may not be able to take another city. the question before president obama now, should be our u.s. arm the rebels? >> i am not ruling it out or in. >> we will have more from the president in a one-on-one interview with brian williams later in this hour. the air starks' targeted tripoli tonight. 22 tomahawk missiles. the largest air assault in recent days. the defense department says the price tag for u.s. taxpayers so far is about $550 million. that is expected to run about $40 million more over the next three weeks. hillary clinton today called this a turning point in libya when she was in london. she met with one of the rebel leaders. what are you seeing on the ground in libya? >> i still can't get over that number, $550 million to destroy tanks from the air. i don't understand how the price tag gets so high so quickly. it could look like a turning point on the ground, but for gaddafi's forces, he is crushing the rebellion. horrible reports emerging. here in the east, his troops began a counteroffensive, erasing many of the gains they had accomplished. >> at times today the rebe
evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say so far the u.s. spent $580 million on the libyan conflict. while we're committed to the operation financially, militarily and diplomatically, questions remain about what it will mean to deem the mission a success. james rosen is at the state department. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. president obama and top commanderrers pushed forward on the parallel and separate path to strip muammar gaddafi of his ability to wage war and pressuring him to resign. today a top nato commander said the missions may connect over time in london, secretary of state hillary clinton met with colleagues from the united nations, europe and arab league to sketch out end game in libya. clinton said arming the libyan rebels were not discussed and only vaguely did she address growing speculation that gaddafi will receive asylum. >> we believe he must go. we're working with the international community to try to achieve that outcome. and look for political resolution which could include leaving the country. >> bret: we are not engaged and look for him to go does
of power. >> as u.s. president obama outlines his position, delegates from dozens of country s arriie in london to discuss libya's future. >>> hello, 5:00 a.m. in washington, 10:00 a.m. in london. >> you're watching "world one live" from london. also ahead. >>> this is a pro-government rally, organized to show support for syria's president assad. >>> more trouble at the japan fukushima nuclear plant. a plutonium leak and tons of contaminated water are the latest hazards. >> good news out of denmark. watch this. >> yeah! >> yes! >> delight for police searching for a missing 3-year-old as news comes in that he's been found. >>> we begin with the crisis in libya and foreign ministers from more than 40 countries are meeting in london today to talk about how libya can move ahead without moammar gadhafi. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton's going to be there, so will the british prime minister david cameron and the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon. there will be a strong showing from the arab world with representatives from qatar, jordan, lebanon, iraq, morocco and tunisia. the talks
moammar gadhafi in power. hillary clinton represents the u.s. ban ki moon and more will attend. they called on gadhafi to leave libya. >>> the u.s. president made his case to fellow americans for intervening in libya's civil war. barack obama said the u.s. had a responsibility to act to the overt a civilian massacre but not to seek by force. libyan fighters very run into resistance. >>> disturbing news we're hearing about radiation levels at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. radioactive water may be leaking from a containment vessel. they've also found plutonium in the soil, but the levels, they say, are not harmful to humans. >>> pro-government demonstrations are expected in syria on tuesday. one of the latest places to have anti-government protests being held. "world business" starts now. >>> good morning, from cnn london, i'm nina del santos. >> and i'm pauline chu, and this is world business today. the top stories on this tuesday, march 29th. u.s. president barack obama tries to explain his country's intervention in libya, but his critics are counting the cost of t
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
week." u.s. and allied bombs and missiles hammer libyan targets. the rebels gain ground. and the president prepares to make his pitch to the american people. >> it's u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> what if gadhafi stays? just back from the middle east, defense secretary robert gates and secretary of state hillary clinton come to "this week" for the first interviews since the attacks began to make the president's case. what does victory look like? can it be achieved? and at what cost? >>> then -- >> i don't have any regrets at all. >> what would donald rumsfeld do in a third war. and he'll respond to critics who say he's been rewriting history. >>> and george will and the "roundtable" will debate the libyan mission, the president's message. and why one hopeful is having a tough time agreeing with himself. >> announcer: live from the newseum. "this week" with christiane amanpour starts now. >> good morning, i'm jake tapper. christiane is off today. >>> some major developments in libya. rebel forces have scored a key victory taking back the oil town of brega in the
the u.s. mission there in libya about cost, about an exit strategy. the president and other senior administration officials have talked about this and narrowly defined in their row focus of this mission. and that the u.s., which has been taking a supporting -- a leading role rather would move in the second phase to a supporting role. what would that look like? well, jay carney, white house spokesman today said that u.s. jets would not be used in enforcing any kind of no-fly zone but it would be more of an assist role perhaps providing jamming technology, even intelligence. so that is how the white house sees this next phase of the mission in live xwrap but again, no official reaction yet to this agreement. one other point i should make is that you know, we're waiting to find out if perhaps the president will make any public comments about this to the american people. there have been a lot of questions about the president perhaps not fully explaining all of the ins and outs of this mission to the american people. the white house has pushed back on that saying from the beginning whet
about this? "jihadis that fought us the u.s. in iraq and afghanistan now enjoy american support in libya." excuse me? that means the people who we were actually shooting at on the battlefield, we now giving arms to in libya. this libya rebel commander says his fighters have al-qaeda links. we'll have more on the story at the bottom of the hour. let's see if we have this right. we have a nobel peace prize winning president, encouraging unrest in the mast. saying rise up, isn't this great? look, now people are rising up. people are getting killed everywhere. then he gave the commander to launch america's third military conflict with a muslim nation that poses no immediate threat. never made the case to the american people. and no exit strategy. no one is even asking or answering the question what does victory look like? chaos. the "new york times" is reporting now that the muslim brotherhood has now formed a tactic partnership with the egyptian military. oh, that seems great. and they're poised to grab control. what do you say? shirria law? no -- shiria law? no. in libya, guess who is lini
is preparing his own take on the u.s. role in the war. >>> also this morning, new fears in japan as radiation levels reach stunning new heights, and the air around the damaged nuclear plant is no longer the worry. rather, it's the water. >>> also something we're keeping an eye on right now in great britain. budget cuts are coming at a high cost for british leaders. protesters on the streets this morning clashing with police officers over proposed austerity measures. we'll have the latest from there. again, this is happening right now. from the cnn center, this is your cnn start morning for this march the 26th. i'm t.j. holmes. we do want to start with a new and disturbing incident in tripoli. this happened today. it's a story that maybe highlights the brutality of a regime that so many people are now fighting against. we want to bring in our cnn international correspondent nic robertson with the latest. tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, t.j., it all began this morning over breakfasttime when a lady came into the hotel, a middle aged appeared to be very respectable lady came into the h
, whether the u.s. should help the rebels by providing them with weapons. emily schmidt has the latest. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. president obama says he is looking at all options to support the rebels. but when members of the international diplomatic community met in london and had a chance to talk about it, one member said the talk of arming rebels didn't come up. with nato set to take command of military operation, president obama says moammar gadhafi is feeling the pressure. >> the circle around gadhafi understands that the noose is tightening. their days are probably numbered. >> reporter: diplomats from more than three dozen countries met in london yesterday, to discuss libya in a potential post-gadhafi era. >> we must help people plan for their future after the conflict is over. >> reporter: but forces loyal to gadhafi are pushing back rebels from ground they just gained. diplomats say they did not discuss arming the rebels. though, the idea is up for debate. >> there could be a legitimate transfer of arms if i country would choose to do that. >> we are th
and former u.s. ambassador bolten why the arab nations should be be paying for this. and n.a.t.o. leaders missing in action and john hunt, sr., and alan simpson why he he may have to go begging to china for dough. or we will, and that's not good. and the company behind all of those f-16's, former lockheed martin ceo says that air power alone will not win this thing. first, the very latest headlines for you, rebel leadners libya now say the strategic eastern oil town of ebadia is now 100% in the hands of rebel forces and destroying an artillery battery and armored vehicles and the president in a warm-up to the big libyan speech planned for monday night, saying today, countless eyes and destroying gaddafi's air defenses and the president saying that we're succeeding in our mission and democrats and republicans unclear what the mission is. and protests continuing in syria and thousands demonstrates near damascus at the same time and the human rights group reporting 70 political prisoners and stocks in saudi arabia, more than 2% today. that's right, the market was over there. one the view on
, hezbollah bullah. it is also a font for regional instability. both in iraq and against u.s. forces there quite frankly syria matters a lot. and libya doesn't matter quite as much, nearly as much. >> shepard: unlike syria, has no plans for actions in syria. in fact, there is a different leader in syria now. many of the members in congress of both parties who have gone to syria in recent months have said they believe he's a reformer "the fox report" chontd jonathan hunt in our newsroom. assaad a reformer? >> there are many syrians, many middle east experts and many on capitol hill who would laugh at the very idea of president assaad as a reformer. among those, senator jon kyl, the republican whip who said in a statement today and i quote, how many more syrians must president assaad murder or assault before secretary of state clinton no longer endorses the notion that is he a reformer. of course, secretary clinton was actually referring to the view of members of congress, not her own personal view. president assaad is probably better thought of as a northern nicener an economic sense.
to support the president. nato will take over responsibility from the u.s. for enforcing the no-fly zone over libya. who is really calling the shots now in the international coalition? welcome to "bbc world news." more coming up in the program and more worries in japan about the fishermen nuclear repay. one of the reactor cores could be damaged -- about the fukushima nuclear plant. in a film that takes you into the interrogation room. we look at four days inside guantanamo. ♪ >> hello, welcome. syria has become the latest hot spot in the middle east, with the ruling elite coming under its biggest challenge in three decades. thousands have demonstrated, calling for more freedom, with protests reported in three more towns. in, protesters climbed about 20 were shot down after a statue of the former president was set alight. in damascus, three people reported to have been killed. ban ki-moon has urged the government to respect and to protect the rights of citizens. protests are taking place elsewhere across the region. in the many capital, , both pro and anti-government demonstrators held their
, by any method. >> now, in a u.s. military briefing just a couple of hours ago, we were told there was no indication gadhafi's forces are moving away from either misrata or ajdabiya. cnn's nic robertson is in the capital city of tripoli. nic, tell me what you have been seeing there if the last 24 hours and also how gadhafi's defiance, if at all, has changed some of the forces within the capital city. >> reporter: well, one of the things we've seen really that reflects the fact that this no-fly zone seems to be fully in place is overnight last night, just before dawn this morning, we heard what sounded like jet aircraft flying overhead and then several loud explosions. so it does give the impression that the coalition can fly and can target locations in and around the city. effectively, it would seem like almost with impunity right now. ajdabiya is a red line for gadhafi. as government officials, they want to hold on to the city. it does appear they're not moving their forces out. the same with misrata. the impression is although a couple of coalition strikes overnight diminis
united does admit that united will be shrinking it's domestic u.s. network because, he says, the focus in the future is going to be on international coverage. >> the domestic u.s. is a very difficult place to make money. brutal regulation and overtaxation, so it's very hard to make money domestically and that's why our growth has been international. even this year as we were originally going to grow between 1% and 2% this year and because of high fuel prices, we have brought that back to flat. but even there, that flat is comprised of shrink the domestic systems and growing the international systems. >> this is fascinating because this tells us that the united-continental merger says that airlines in the united states is going to start to look very different. it's got these massive hubs, chicago, washington, houston, newark, los angeles, san francisco, denver. but they're going to be geared to funneling out to the rest of the world. >> so did he say anything about the frequent flyer miles? that's what i want to know. >> tell me about it. he did admit that between them, united and conti
in libya, what's the end game, how do we get out? the role the u.s. will play from here on out and how important is it that gadhafi goes. and how did we wind up fighting in a country that even the country's own defense secretary on sunday said is not a vital u.s. interest. tonight, we'll look at what the president needs to say and the big stakes for him politically in lya if the effort for him goes bad. then we'll bring the president's speech live from the national war college here inform washington, d.c. let's begin with andrea mitch l mitchell. and of course, the huffington post's howard fineman who is an msnbc political analyst. what must the president say? here's a couple of clips. >> when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize an entire region and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> that was the radio address on saturday. here's what he said in south america last week about why we're there. >> our military action is in support of an international man
on intelligence operations and had been careful to what president obama had said publicly that no u.s. ground troops will be sent into libya. but, u.s. officials say there are small cia teams on the ground in eastern libya trying to fair ret out who are the leaders of the opposition? what are their motivations? what do they want for libya. said to be a special. there have been cia operatives in benghazi. when that f-15 jet went down last week and the two pilots ejected. we know one of them ended up in benghazi and some u.s. undercover agents were able to get him out of the country. shep? >> shepard: without some sort of help, it's widely believed or further help i should say it's widely belief these rebels trying to overthrow the government can't win. new debate in washington whether to give those rebels weapons. how is that going? >> that's a tough question, because some military leaders have said they have seen, quote, flickers of al qaeda involvement with the rebels and clearly nobody at the white house or no lawmaker on capitol hill wants to arm a terrorist. the white house said today tha
: international forces attack muammar qaddafi's military. u.s. and coalition fighters flying more than 150 air anythings over north africa nation and firing 16 cruise missiles in the past 24 hours according to a spokesman after nato agreed last night to assume command of the no-fly zone. but united states and other allied forces are in charm of the rest of the world in including attacks on the ground forces which is the toughest part of the operation and the most controversial. the quick exit does not appear likely and now steve harrigan in the libyan capital but first over to the pentagon. the transition of command is happening. what does it mean? >> we are told from a senior nato official it is being transitioned and it will take 72 hours before general ham can hand over to the nato command structure and the new lieutenant general, the canadian lieutenant general is put in charge of the no-fly zone. the enforcement of the no-fly zone will still be robust. this is not going to just be planes looking for aircraft in the sky. it will be a robust enforcement of the no-fly zone. listen to investi
>>> making news in america this morning -- >> the u.s. gets ready to hand off the mission in libya, after president obama makes his case to the nation, that military intervention was necessary. >>> from california, a sliding hillside puts homes in danger. families told to get out before their houses tumbled down. >>> and the drastic measures taken by one teen who wanted a new car. wait until you hear what she did to get it. >>> and good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. president obama takes his case for military action against libya on the road today. it will be part of a major speech that mr. obama gives later today. >> right here in new york. >> and last night, the president spoke to the nation to defend his choices and also to announce that nato will take over the lead role tomorrow. emily schmidt is joining us from washington with all the details. good morning, emily. >> reporter: peggy and rob, good morning to you. before president obama used the word libya last night, he said the words international effort. and he said the world had had a responsibility to a
on u.s. actions in libya. that speech is scheduled for monday, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. watch it live right here on the fox news channel. >> heather: as we reported at the top of the show we do have new reaction coming to the death of an american pioneer led the way for women and politics, broke that glass ceiling. >> gregg: joining us -- do we have -- apparently we don't. july july with the latest. >> julie: after suffering complications of blood cancer she had battled for 12 years, geraldine ferraro was surrounded by her family when she passed away this morning at massachusetts general hospital. and president obama just moments ago, he says he will forever be remembered as a trail blazer that broke down barriers for women. whether it was at a public school, a teacher, an assistant district attorney, member of congress or candidate for vice president. she fought to uphold the founding ideals of quality and justice and opportunity for all. she leaves behind her husband, three children and eight grandchildren. in a statement her family says geraldine ferraro was widely known as a leade
made the case on u.s. involvement in libya, the military is preparing to scale back the role and let nato take command. at the same time, members from 40 nations gather in london to discuss the end game in libya and a possible future without muammar qaddafi. at home nato allied supreme commander in europe, is telling congress he is optimistic muammar qaddafi will fall under the pressure. >> we have a chance at muammar qaddafi leaving because the entire international community is again him. >>shepard: muammar qaddafi ruled for four decades and repeatedly said he will never give up and despite international strikes against his military, the rebels say the government is better armed and organization than anything makeshift they come up with. there are muammar qaddafi's government tanks and rockets driving back the open opposition. though are trying to retreat, the relatives from a town. >> regular cars are fighting with machine guns, et cetera, et cetera, we did not have arms or we would finish muammar qaddafi in a few days. >>shepard: a spokesman for the opposition in london asking the
] [inaudible conversations] >>> top officials from the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told senators today that the damaged nuclear power plant in japan, quote come continues to further stabilize, and that there have been no radiation readings in the u.s. the might be of concern. these remarks came before the meeting of the senate energy and natural resources committee. other speakers included officials from the energy department, the nuclear energy institute and the union of concerned scientists. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> thank you for being here. this is a briefing. this is not a hearing has such. the reason we try to it as a briefing is so that people wouldn't have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all of that and things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation that the nuclear power plant. will the committee doesn't have direct oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants we do have to consider how events such as those affect the ability of the nation's nuclear fleet of 104 reactors to supply electricity, this of course the 104 react
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
housing the u.s. mission to the united nations. the ronald h. brown building was commerce secretary during clinton's first term in office. >>> the shuttle "endeavour" arrives in the space shuttle tonight. it's set to lift off for the final space mission. it's time to continue to suzanne malveaux. i'll be over to talk about the obama doctrine. >>> live from studio 7, i'm suzanne malveaux. want to get you up to speed. i want to go directly to ras lanouf. what is the latest over there? >> hi, suzanne, well, for the last hour and a half, we've been hearing and seeing a fairly heavy artillery barrage. we've been hearing the explosions taking place on the other side of ras lanouf. they are trading artillery with gadhafi's military. this is a blow to the opposition that has been forced back from its positions in ben jawad, 40 miles to the west of here. they came under heavy sustained artillery, tank and rocket fire, as well as snipers inside that town firing on them. they were unable to sustain that, stand up against it. we saw them beating a hastety retreat from ben jawad coming here to r
.com click on the you decide link today. we're asking if the u.s. should arm libya's rebels. there are some questions about that. click on your answer and you can see how other people are voting. so far more than a thouf you have weighed in. you can check it out at foxnews.com. so many tkpwres, about who the opposition is. gregg: the president didn't talk about arming the rebels but a lot of people are saying he really should have done that. we want your thoughts on that. in the meantime there is a new wave of protests in yemen this morning. take a look at this demonstrators calling for the immediate ouster of ali abdullah saleh and demanding political reforms. now ali abdullah saleh has promised to september down at the end of his term, dozens of protesters have been killed in yemen since antigovernment violent tkepl straeugtss broke out last month. and now syria where president's has resigned, they just quit. human rights groups claiming that dozen of antigovernment protesters were killed by the syrian troops. hundreds of house of progovernment demonstrators are flooding the streets of da
for the u.s., the intel community, works very hard to provide the administration, whatever administration is, with the best information possible and available at that moment. whoever has the best information likely is going to make the best decisions in the best interest of the u.s., which is not to engage in war overseas. there is a tendency to think that is what we're doing, that are warmongers. the real world is, unfortunately, more difficult. i would argue that thegency, you know, is a tool used by any administration to enhance transparency, to minimize the risk that people face overseas, that the government faces overseas. then again people will be watching this. ey will think hey that mike baker is pretty subjective. hostmimike baker a >> president obama is speaking about libya later today from national defense university. ahead of the speech, the associated press wrote that the white house made it clear that it was not a precedent for involvement in other nations that hold strategic interests for the u.s.. we will have the president's speech live at 7:30 eastern and we will take your
the objective and u.s. involvement in the conflict. he did defend his decision to engage u.s. military forces in that conflict. in his weekly radio address today, he touted the successes of u.s. and coalition forces saying they have both helped to knock down moammar gadhafi's air defense mechanisms as well as push back his ground forces. the president said that he had to engage in this conflict to do to save lives. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a blood bath that could destabilize an entire region, and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> reporter: but the president is facing mounting criticisms from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who say there is a lack of congressional involvement in setting up u.s. policy in libya. and the president held a conference call with congressional leaders yesterday, trying to add
up to speed on march 31st. >>> u.s. intelligence source says cia operatives are on the ground in libya today to size up rebel fighters. the source says they are not there for battlefield direction. congress asked defense secretary robert gates about the cia story a short time ago. >> do you see the use of cia and u.s. special forces in libya as following the blueprint we used in afghanistan? >> first of all, i can't speak to any cia activities, but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states' military there will be no boots on the ground. >> britain says it has not promised immunity to libya's top diplomat. foreign minister moussa koussa defected wednesday. they say this man moi be a treasure trove of information. >> reporter: it's significant for many reasons, not the least of which he was former head of intelligence. not least of which is because he was at one time a wanted figure by european security services. this is a man whose disappearance here wasn't even known by the deputy foreign minister. >> libyan rebels remain in ful
at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
the american people what the u.s. role is in this mission. plenty of confusion right now on that front. >>> in japan, water with radiation levels 100,000 times the norm. and fears that some of it might be in the pacific ocean. >>> in libya, rebel forces are marching toward the capital. and after a weekend of key victories, the most pivotal fight may now be under way. cnn's resa is in libya where rebels seem to have seized the momentum. first off why the turnaround? >> i'm sorry, carol, i couldn't hear you. >> i just asked you why the turnaround for the libyan rebels? >> well, i think it had a lot to do with the air strikes. the coalition air strikes that started saturday. and there's no question that the momentum has shifted. i don't think too many people could have predicted in a matter of three days, these opposition forces would gain about 200 miles in territory and capture about five key cities. but that's exactly what has happened. the latest town to go into the habds of opposition forces, the town of ben jawad. and i think this surge, this shift in momentum started on saturday wi
. they will not be successful doing so. >>> u.s. soldier jeremy morelock has pleaded guilty to charges he and other soldiers killed afghan citizens for sport last year. but morelock's possible life sentence was reduced to 24 years in a plea deal. german news magazines have published photographs showing morelock and other soldiers posing over the bodies of dead afghans. >>> allied attacks on tripoli are continuing into a sixth day. take a look at these pictures. they're from libyan state tv, and they reportedly show the destruction at a military base in tripoli. look at that fire raging. these were apparently filmed just after a coalition air strike. the coalition attacks on military targets have now grounded gadhafi's air force and crippled the country's air defenses. so strikes from now on are focusing more on ground troops as they move toward rebel-held towns to try and recapture them. >>> the libyan government says a number of civilians have been killed by coalition air strikes including women and children. to prove it, they bundled foreign reporter on it a convoy of buses to show them a house they said
says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victo, denouncinghat he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for control in eastern libya, where thehave been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention w
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
. and the biggest demonstrations and rolling out i'm told in 20 european cities, at least 36 u.s. cities plan for similar type union sympathizing demonstrations in this country, whereof course, this is an extension of what happened not only in portugal last week, where austerity measures were rejected by the parliament and everything went kablewy and this is wisconsin and the union crackdown there, but they're all united in this one respect, they're ticked. and if unions win there, is that trouble for us here everywhere? after this. what does it take to fly? it takes knowing we have our work cut out for us. but if you run before the wind you can't take off. you've got to turn into it. the thing you push against lifts you up. so, every challenge is a chance to show that even in this crazy world of no liquids and route cancellations someone still has the passenger's back. and along the way we'll prove we're not just building a bigger airline we're building a better one. >> all right. still keeping sour eye on london right now. thanks got a little violent today and this is a sort of global demo
. the u.s. is making it increasingly clear that having been in the lead of the libyan mission, it wants to step back now. the latest reports from the rebel-held town talk of pro gaddafi snipers filing at the hospital. -- firing at the hospital. >> please, please bomb his forces until they stop. i have to be impartial because i am a medical person, but five, six consecutive days that have been killing with tanks and artillery, bombing us. please stop him. >> other residents say they have attacked their base. the rebels remain for now force of on certain potential, but it is clear the situation is increasingly turning into a test of the coalition possibility to influence events on the ground. -- the coalition's ability to influence events on the ground. >> with me now it is ben brown. there has been much activity around you today? >> the rebels are still trying to push west, about an hour-and- a-half from here, trying to take advantage of the coalition air strikes and military action which they are seeing day after day, night after night. the rebels are making heavy delegate of getting an
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
from under a three-star general and it means that the u.s. will effectively now be taking a supportive role rather than the primary role in this operation going forward really just sending in reconnaissance and jamming planes rather than conducting a majority of the strike missions it has been and, of course, the cruise missiles. >> is it clear what would constitute success and when the operation would be over? >> reporter: that's at the moment is not clear, in fact, on the sunday talk shows in the united states, secretary of defense and the secretary of state were asked that kind of thing and could give no collar indication of whether this be a question of weeks, months or whether it would be over by the end of the year so we are hoping for more details as the day progresses but i think it's hard to ascertain how long this campaign might continue, zain. >> cnn diana magnay reporting, thanks, diana. >>> another look at how the rebels advanced. operation held areas are here marked in yellow. areas under control are marked in green. on friday the rebels were in control of benghazi. colon
, this the morning after president obama said it would happen. watch this attack from the u.s.-led operation in the mediterranean. meanwhile, on the ground, where that tomahawk cruise missile is headed, reports from the desert that qaddafi soldiers are attacking rebel fighters with a hella machine gun and rocket fire. the lead libyan brigade, led by one of qaddafi's sons, pushing rebels away from the home town of sirte and sirte is where the battle will be joined. good morning, everybody. a lot of developments from oophnight and the morning here. welcome, i'm bill hemmer here in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: very busy. goodgood morning, bill, good morning, everybody. i'm martha maccallum. these attacks come as pentagon officials tell fox news that they are closely watching a qaddafi facility that could be storing materials to make chemical weapons and although troops are standing their ground today, there are signs that qaddafi's inner circle may be starting to crack. bill: want to go live to rick leventhal, live from ras lanuf. rick, hello. >> we're running an active c
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